Nishimura Yoshiki: This researcher from Kyoto University in Japan has been studying cpDNA for over twenty years. He recently published a paper describing his findings regarding a gene called moc1 that has befuddled researchers for decades. It also goes on to describe the unexpected discovery of Holliday Junctions within cpDNA. He set aside time from his research schedule to chat with SCINQ. [Read]

MORE CONVERSATIONS

  1. Nishimura Yoshiki: This researcher from Kyoto University in Japan has been studying cpDNA for over twenty years. He recently published a paper describing his findings regarding a gene called moc1 that has befuddled researchers for decades. It also goes on to describe the unexpected discovery of Holliday Junctions within cpDNA. He set aside time from his research schedule to chat with SCINQ. [Read]
  2. Saito Susumu: Saito Susumu from Nagoya University in Japan has developed a catalyst capable of destroying the pesky double bonds in plastic. If his method can scale up sufficiently, the world might stand a chance against the scourge of plastics. SCINQ spoke with him to learn more about his plastic-reducing catalyst. [Read]
  3. Stephen Tsang – A recent study by Columbia University’s Stephen Tsang provides an important and timely addition to the discourse forming around CRISPR-cas9 technology, its uses, and its safety. SCINQ caught up with him to discuss his findings. [Read]
  4. Eran ElhaikSCINQ spoke with Dr. Elhaik about aGPS, it’s application, and how he applied it in his most recent study, “From lost empires to modern cities with ancient GPS.” [Read]
  5. Katriona Shea – This Penn State researcher applies her knowledge of population management to various Ebola outbreak data sources in order to develop a more efficient on-the-ground real-time response to the constantly shifting conditions that arise during an epidemic. [Read]