Hospital-acquired pneumonia affects patients of all ages

Hospital-acquired pneumonia has long been associated with the elderly and intensive care units (ICU). But according to a new multicenter nationwide study, nonventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP) occurs across all units in all types and sizes of U.S. hospitals, putting every patient--the young included--at higher risk for developing the infection. The findings, published in the January … Continue reading Hospital-acquired pneumonia affects patients of all ages

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Quicker screening for antibiotic peptides may jump-start drug development

Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of potential drugs for fighting infections, an innovation that holds promise for combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method involves engineering bacteria to produce and test molecules that are potentially toxic to themselves. A description … Continue reading Quicker screening for antibiotic peptides may jump-start drug development

Cattle-based MERS treatment shows promise

An experimental treatment developed from cattle plasma for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus infection shows broad potential, according to a small clinical trial led by National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues. The treatment, SAB-301, was safe and well tolerated by healthy volunteers, with only minor reactions documented. The first confirmed case of … Continue reading Cattle-based MERS treatment shows promise

Malnutrition is being underdiagnosed in US hospitals

Malnutrition among hospitalized patients remains a serious issue that has been underdiagnosed and undertreated for decades. It is estimated that nearly one out of five pediatric patients and one out of three adult patients aged 60 and older are malnourished. In the current issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics healthcare … Continue reading Malnutrition is being underdiagnosed in US hospitals

The development of once-a-week HIV antiretrovirals can be a game changer

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a capsule that can deliver a week's worth of HIV drugs in a single dose. This advance could make it much easier for patients to adhere to the strict schedule of dosing required for the drug cocktails used to fight the virus, the researchers say. … Continue reading The development of once-a-week HIV antiretrovirals can be a game changer

Answering one evolutionary mystery results in many more

Scientists have found an explanation for how flowering plants became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world -- a problem that Charles Darwin called an 'abominable mystery'. In a study in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Kevin Simonin and Adam Roddy, from San Francisco State University and Yale University respectively, found that flowering … Continue reading Answering one evolutionary mystery results in many more

Pseudomonas infections provide clues in fighting resistance

Antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas infections in cystic fibrosis patients show predictable sensitivities to other classes of antibiotics. A new study made by scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability at the Technical University of Denmark suggests that this could lead to new ways of optimizing treatments for chronic infections. "Our discovery of widespread antibiotic sensitivities … Continue reading Pseudomonas infections provide clues in fighting resistance

Middle-aged and unhealthy? There’s hope yet

Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation. Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their … Continue reading Middle-aged and unhealthy? There’s hope yet

Body’s immune response to Zika harms fetal development

The same proteins that mount a potent immune response to Zika viral infection can also harm the placenta and fetal development, according to a Yale-led study published in Science Immunology. Zika researchers had established that these antiviral proteins, known as type I interferons, were required to fight Zika infection in mothers. But it was not … Continue reading Body’s immune response to Zika harms fetal development