The Patterned Landscape: Brigitte Caramanna’s nature etchings

Brigitte Caramanna’s etchings range from intimate cellular landscapes to vast, otherworldly stretches of rocky terrain. Other times, she draws on organic bursts embodied by the branching of a tree or the budding of a cell. Her prints can feel unsettling, the way film negatives do. Their inversion of colors suggest a phantasmagorical alternate reality. Yet, … Continue reading The Patterned Landscape: Brigitte Caramanna’s nature etchings

The Big Question with Miljana Radivojevic

Dr. Miljana Radivojevic is a post-doc researcher at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology University of Cambridge. Her specific area of interest deals with the invention and innovation of prehistoric metallurgical processes in Eurasia. What is the biggest question facing your field today? Archaeological science, as many other sciences today, … Continue reading The Big Question with Miljana Radivojevic

Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Movements need champions. People engaged in promoting the cause and presenting it to the uninitiated. They articulate a movement’s central ideas, distilling it to the essentials. Most importantly, they foster a sense of community, physical and mental by planning events and spearheading organizations. Sometimes, the task falls to critics and theorists. Other times, the evangelists … Continue reading Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

Vegetables. The bane of every child’s culinary existence. It’s divisive even among many adults (Ardent carnivores vs. vegetarians). In the whole pantheon of vegetables your mother forced you to eat,  broccoli elicits the strongest wails of protestation. Maligned by presidents past and anyone going on a first date, it's undesirable reputation precedes itself. Of course, … Continue reading Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

The development of once-a-week HIV antiretrovirals can be a game changer

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a capsule that can deliver a week's worth of HIV drugs in a single dose. This advance could make it much easier for patients to adhere to the strict schedule of dosing required for the drug cocktails used to fight the virus, the researchers say. … Continue reading The development of once-a-week HIV antiretrovirals can be a game changer

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Answering one evolutionary mystery results in many more

Scientists have found an explanation for how flowering plants became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world -- a problem that Charles Darwin called an 'abominable mystery'. In a study in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Kevin Simonin and Adam Roddy, from San Francisco State University and Yale University respectively, found that flowering … Continue reading Answering one evolutionary mystery results in many more

Pseudomonas infections provide clues in fighting resistance

Antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas infections in cystic fibrosis patients show predictable sensitivities to other classes of antibiotics. A new study made by scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability at the Technical University of Denmark suggests that this could lead to new ways of optimizing treatments for chronic infections. "Our discovery of widespread antibiotic sensitivities … Continue reading Pseudomonas infections provide clues in fighting resistance

Plants have a DNA mutation repair system keeping watch

Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. Whilst DNA sequence mutation is the fundamental fuel of species evolution, mutations in genes are often harmful. As a form of defence, organisms have evolved repair mechanisms to correct the DNA sequence following … Continue reading Plants have a DNA mutation repair system keeping watch

Sitting in a sauna may be like exercise without the activity

Over the past couple of years, scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study … Continue reading Sitting in a sauna may be like exercise without the activity

Alternatives to antibiotics may help preserve their effectiveness

Resistance to antibiotics poses a serious and sometimes deadly challenge to the treatment of severe bacterial infections. In a new Essay publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Kristofer Wollein Waldetoft and Sam P. Brown of Georgia Institute of Technology propose that development of alternative therapies for mild infections could help slow the development … Continue reading Alternatives to antibiotics may help preserve their effectiveness

Sowing the seeds of healthy coral reefs

The troubling loss of coral reefs worldwide has prompted scientists and conservationists to assist the reefs' recovery through active restoration approaches. Transplanting corals on degraded reefs aims at increasing coral cover and subsequently promoting structural habitats. Until now, actual restoration has been done manually by divers, who had to attach each coral, whether a fragment … Continue reading Sowing the seeds of healthy coral reefs

Just when you thought you had mosquitoes beat…

For decades, chemical pesticides have been the most important way of controlling insects like the Anopheles mosquito species that spreads malaria to humans. Unfortunately, the bugs have fought back, evolving genetic shields to protect themselves and their offspring from future attacks. The fascinating array of genetic changes that confer pesticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is … Continue reading Just when you thought you had mosquitoes beat…

Scientists create a different pathway to solar cells

Materials scientists at Duke University have developed a method to create hybrid thin-film materials that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to make. The technique could be the gateway to new generations of solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. The research team described their methods in the journal ACS Energy Letters. Perovskites are a class … Continue reading Scientists create a different pathway to solar cells