The Big Question with Wang Qing

Associate Professor Wang Qing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Engineering and his group focus their attention on understanding everything from "charge propagations in mesoscopic energy conversion and storage systems, to the development of new approaches for advanced electrochemical/photoelectrochemical energy conversion and storage." That places them in the … Continue reading The Big Question with Wang Qing

The Patterned Landscape: Brigitte Caramanna’s nature etchings

Brigitte Caramanna’s etchings range from intimate cellular landscapes to vast, otherworldly stretches of rocky terrain. Other times, she draws on organic bursts embodied by the branching of a tree or the budding of a cell. Her prints can feel unsettling, the way film negatives do. Their inversion of colors suggest a phantasmagorical alternate reality. Yet, … Continue reading The Patterned Landscape: Brigitte Caramanna’s nature etchings

The Big Question with Miljana Radivojevic

Dr. Miljana Radivojevic is a post-doc researcher at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology University of Cambridge. Her specific area of interest deals with the invention and innovation of prehistoric metallurgical processes in Eurasia. What is the biggest question facing your field today? Archaeological science, as many other sciences today, … Continue reading The Big Question with Miljana Radivojevic

Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Movements need champions. People engaged in promoting the cause and presenting it to the uninitiated. They articulate a movement’s central ideas, distilling it to the essentials. Most importantly, they foster a sense of community, physical and mental by planning events and spearheading organizations. Sometimes, the task falls to critics and theorists. Other times, the evangelists … Continue reading Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

Vegetables. The bane of every child’s culinary existence. It’s divisive even among many adults (Ardent carnivores vs. vegetarians). In the whole pantheon of vegetables your mother forced you to eat,  broccoli elicits the strongest wails of protestation. Maligned by presidents past and anyone going on a first date, it's undesirable reputation precedes itself. Of course, … Continue reading Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

Destroying the quantum properties of individual atoms

Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. In an international collaboration with IBM Research in San Jose, USA, using advanced and novel techniques, QNS scientists identified which mechanisms destroy the quantum properties of individual atoms … Continue reading Destroying the quantum properties of individual atoms

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One day, doctors may test a drug’s efficacy on chips before using on humans

Investigators have demonstrated how cells of a human intestinal lining created outside an individual's body mirror living tissue when placed inside microengineered Intestine-Chips, opening the door to personalized testing of drug treatments. The findings have the potential to change how patients are treated for debilitating, inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with a genetic component, such as Crohn's … Continue reading One day, doctors may test a drug’s efficacy on chips before using on humans

The quest continues to understand the body’s response to flu vaccines

Scientists are now equipped with a more detailed picture of the human immune system's response to influenza vaccination, thanks to the results of a new investigation. They say their findings could help guide better vaccine development, because understanding the cellular basis for protective immunity is critical for creating effective immunizations. Even though influenza vaccination is … Continue reading The quest continues to understand the body’s response to flu vaccines

Infant deaths during first month still problematic

An analysis of trends in sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) over the past two decades finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) "back to sleep" recommendations, did not occur in infants in the first month of life. The report from investigators from … Continue reading Infant deaths during first month still problematic

With a little help, Aurora Borealis’ secrets come in view

The shower of electrons bouncing across Earth's magnetosphere - commonly known as the Northern Lights - has been directly observed for the first time by an international team of scientists. While the cause of these colorful auroras has long been hypothesized, researchers had never directly observed the underlying mechanism until now. The scientists published their … Continue reading With a little help, Aurora Borealis’ secrets come in view

Researchers show breeding temperature-resilient crops are possible

Breeding temperature-resilient crops is an "achievable dream" in one of the most important species of commercially-cultivated plants, according to a new study. The vision of crop improvement in the face of climate change is outlined in research by the John Innes Centre which establishes a genetic link between increased temperature and the problem of "pod … Continue reading Researchers show breeding temperature-resilient crops are possible

Vaping offer benefits with potential for harm

What should physicians say to their patients who ask them about the safety of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and whether the devices can help them quit smoking? Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) physician Nancy Rigotti, MD, outlines what is and is not known about the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes in a commentary published in the February … Continue reading Vaping offer benefits with potential for harm

There’s a chance these distant planets have a lot of water

Planets around the faint red star TRAPPIST-1, just 40 light-years from Earth, were first detected by the TRAPPIST-South telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in 2016. In the following year further observations from ground-based telescopes, including ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, revealed that there were no fewer than seven planets in … Continue reading There’s a chance these distant planets have a lot of water

Is this the answer to the scaling up problem facing HIV vaccines?

Research on HIV over the past decade has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason for this is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to Phil … Continue reading Is this the answer to the scaling up problem facing HIV vaccines?