Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Movements need champions. People engaged in promoting the cause and presenting it to the uninitiated. They articulate a movement’s central ideas, distilling it to the essentials. Most importantly, they foster a sense of community, physical and mental by planning events and spearheading organizations. Sometimes, the task falls to critics and theorists. Other times, the evangelists … Continue reading Come Together: Julia Buntaine and the SciArt Center

Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

Vegetables. The bane of every child’s culinary existence. It’s divisive even among many adults (Ardent carnivores vs. vegetarians). In the whole pantheon of vegetables your mother forced you to eat,  broccoli elicits the strongest wails of protestation. Maligned by presidents past and anyone going on a first date, it's undesirable reputation precedes itself. Of course, … Continue reading Conversations with Anders Rosengren: On broccoli’s antidiabetic potential

Conversations with Rick Cavicchioli: Antarctic clues to virus evolution

The image of the staid scientist holed up in the laboratory surrounded by similarly tempered collaborators is a quaint and ill-founded one. Not that they don’t knuckle down in the lab. They do. However, there’s a lot more old-fashioned, boots-on-the-ground, adventuring-to-distant-lands than you’d think. The same way there are photographers like James Nachtway and Don … Continue reading Conversations with Rick Cavicchioli: Antarctic clues to virus evolution

The Big Question with Sara Del Valle

Sara Del Valle is a computational epidemiologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory who uses mathematical models to predict the spread of diseases. What is the biggest question facing your field?  The next frontier in epidemiology is forecasting diseases. We’ve spent the last several decades working to understand disease dynamics—what causes them, how they’re transmitted, how … Continue reading The Big Question with Sara Del Valle

DNA repairman seen at the atomic level

Cells continuously replicate to repair and replace damaged tissue, and each division requires a reprinting of the cell's genetic blueprints. As the DNA duplicates, errors inevitably occur, resulting in damage that, if left unrepaired, can lead to cellular death. At the first hint of DNA damage, a protein known as an ATR kinase activates the … Continue reading DNA repairman seen at the atomic level

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Adaptable bacteria living off methane gas in caves

In a surprising find deep in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University at Galveston doctoral student have discovered that cave-adapted organisms can exist off of methane gas and the bacteria near it, and it raises the possibility that other life forms are also living … Continue reading Adaptable bacteria living off methane gas in caves

Exposure to antibiotics during labor delays microbiota formation in babies

Antibiotics administered during labour for Group B Streptococcus (GBS) affect the development of gut bacteria in babies, according to a study from McMaster University. The research showed that babies exposed to the antibiotics for GBS during labour had a delay in the maturation of their gut bacteria, known as microbiota. The data also showed that … Continue reading Exposure to antibiotics during labor delays microbiota formation in babies

lncRNAs play key role in ovarian cancer progression

Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States, resulting in an estimated 14,100 deaths and 22,500 new cases in 2017 alone. This high mortality is primarily caused by resistance to therapy and the diagnosis of ovarian cancer after it has already metastasized, which occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients. A … Continue reading lncRNAs play key role in ovarian cancer progression

Observed star formations are defying expectations

At the center of our galaxy, in the immediate vicinity of its supermassive black hole, is a region wracked by powerful tidal forces and bathed in intense ultraviolet light and X-ray radiation. These harsh conditions, astronomers surmise, do not favor star formation, especially low-mass stars like our sun. Surprisingly, new observations from the Atacama Large … Continue reading Observed star formations are defying expectations

Red meat can put you into anaphylactic shock

While rare, some people experience recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis--a life-threatening allergic reaction that causes symptoms such as the constriction of airways and a dangerous drop in blood pressure--for which the triggers are never identified. Recently, researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that … Continue reading Red meat can put you into anaphylactic shock

Understanding bacterial diversity from at the genomic level

Sergei Maslov, a professor of bioengineering and physics at the University of Illinois, sees a "universe in a grain of sand." His research seeks to explore that universe by focusing on the genomic diversity of its constituents: the millions of microbes that thrive and reproduce within it. Maslov's recent study, published in Genetics, examined the … Continue reading Understanding bacterial diversity from at the genomic level

Scientists create new antibiotic that’s part mushroom, part synthetic

Combining the innovations of synthetic biology with biology and chemistry, a team of scientists at the University of Bristol have generated a brand-new platform that will allow the production of desperately needed brand-new antibiotics. With resistance growing to existing antibiotics, there is a vital and urgent need for the discovery and development of new antibiotics … Continue reading Scientists create new antibiotic that’s part mushroom, part synthetic

Being stressed all the time isn’t helping your health much

New research shows that chronic stress suppresses the immune system's response to cancer, reducing the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments. University of Queensland scientists say they are investigating dual therapies for patients to reduce stress signalling and improve their response to treatments. UQ Diamantina Institute researcher Dr Stephen Mattarollo said lymphoma progressed more rapidly in mouse … Continue reading Being stressed all the time isn’t helping your health much

Darwin meets Sesame Street with new finch species

Darwin's finches in the Galápagos archipelago provide an iconic model for the evolution of biodiversity on earth due to natural selection. A team of scientists from Princeton University and Uppsala University now reports that they have observed the origin of a new species. A new lineage was formed by the hybridization of two different species … Continue reading Darwin meets Sesame Street with new finch species